The Horror Story of What Lurks Below Your Street

We pause in our writing of Book 4 Tom Stone: One Shot, One Kill to bring you a story of sub-municipal havoc—a sewer creature preying on unsuspecting and red-blooded Americans like you – and me. This tale of tentacles reaching through residential and commercial plumbing was woven by the sludge-filled imagination of Lon Casler Bixby, who actually practices good hygiene.

Written in screenplay format, Sewer Creature is available on Amazon.

Cover art is from London-based artist Ben Southgate.

Just don’t read it when you are most vulnerable.

SCREENPLAY AS ART

Lon has written numerous screenplays, including one on Detective Tom Stone that we turned into the action-adventure, crime fiction Detective Tom Stone Series.

Often, screenplays end up in the inner recesses of production company desks and interns, held captive, and are never allowed to see the light of day.

So Lon has graciously released his creation for the public to purchase and enjoy.

LON’S HUMOR

Dark, light, and a bit off the wall is one way to describe Lon’s brand of humor. Black is his favorite color to dress in and yet he has a light personality along with a friendly and positive attitude. Go figure.

OTHER SEWER CREATURES

 Now, don’t discount the idea of sewer creatures. Consider the miles of moist tunnels, snaking beneath major cities in North America, Europe and Asia. And toss in Australia for good measure.

You’re telling me that a sewer creature couldn’t possibly exist?

Videos on YouTube beg to differ with your skeptical beliefs. And just like Facebook, if it’s on YouTube, then damn it, it must be true.

In fact, the public works department from Carlisle, PA ran an entire story on a sewer creature one Halloween. How can you have fiction without having fact since fiction is based on fact? Huh? Try to convince me.

So now indulge yourself in a little sewage humor and drama.

Take a free peek of Sewer Creature on Amazon.

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The fruit that cocaine smugglers like to use

What is it about pineapple that’s so doggone attractive for cocaine smugglers. Some of the largest drug busts in the last few years have been finding coke in pineapples. Just think about the pineapples that have made it through.

If you like adventure novels with drug smuggling, check out our Tom Stone books on this blog site and on Amazon.

Savannah, Georgia — Coke in Pineapples

A news report from early 2019, revealed that cocaine smugglers from Colombia tried to sneak about 1,000 pounds of coke worth $19 million past authorities. It didn’t work. The CBP Area Port Director, Lisa Beth Brown, said the find was “an outstanding interception of narcotics by our CBP officers” and the work highlights what “our officers do each day to stop illegal activity at our borders and ports of entry.”

Spain and Portugal 2018

Authorities in Spain and Portugal got their notice a year earlier when inspecting a container of pineapples. The little white powder was everywhere.

According to Reuters, the coke-stuffed pineapples were discovered as part of a collaboration between police in Spain and Portugal that began almost a year ago. The joint investigation led them to search a series of shipping containers, where they discovered that the shipment of pineapples from South America was moving more than just fruit.

Around 745 kg of cocaine—1,642 pounds—were split into packages, coated in pineapple-yellow wax, and hidden inside hollowed-out shells of the spiky fruit. Police seized the fruit stash of blow and raided a lab in Spain where the stuff was allegedly going to be cut and repackaged, making nine arrests in the process, Business Insider reports.

Costa Rica Pineapple Growers are Ticked

Pineapple growers in Costa Rica are upset with the cartels for using their precious fruit to smuggle illicit drugs. The pineapple growers say the smuggling hurts their reputation and can damage their industry since the smugglers are coming out of Colombia.

In Costa Rica, exporters ship out about 2,000 containers of pineapples every week.

Abel Chavez , the president of the National Chamber of Producers and Exporters of Pineapple (Canapep), says “The damage that this is doing to the country’s image and to the sector is big. The country can lose competitiveness over this. The countries that import pineapple from Costa Rica might decide to scan the shipments of pineapple for security reasons, and this could result in an additional cost for the industry.

Cocaine Smuggling in our Tom Stone Novels

In Tom Stone: A Nitty Gritty Christmas, we introduce cocaine smuggling using candy in vending machines. The find puts Detective Tom Stone onto the heels of Anthony Angelino, a story line that continues through Tom Stone: Sweltering Summer Nights and Tom Stone: Day of the Dead.

All 3 novels are available on Amazon and our fourth novel Tom Stone: One Shot, One Kill will be out in Summer 2019.

Minor Characters Bad and Good in Los Angeles Thriller

Minor characters, both nasty and nice, mean a lot to us in our Detective Tom Stone thriller novels. No story is complete unless a minor character with meaning is there to add and shape the story line.

Minor Characters Add Depth

Imagine a movie or novel without any minor characters. Okay, does Castaway with Tom Hanks qualify as an example? There’s always an exception. But in movies or novels, those characters with small parts can loom large in the memory bank.

Who are the minor characters that you remember from books of any genre, movies, television or stage? Mention them in the comments. It’d be fun to see who they are. The very first one who comes to mind for me is one I can only describe from Animal House is “that guy with the thick glasses” in a green shirt.

The scene comes with the fraternity brothers are kicked out of school and two guys are moaning about. One has been beaten up. John Belushi stands up and yells, “Hey, what’s all this lying around shit?”

The guy in green says “What the hell are we supposed to do you moron?

One line that I remember from a movie I saw 41 years ago. That’s even less than a minor character.

Tom Stone: Day of the Dead Book 3 in the Tom Stone series

Our Minor Character Ronaldo

We have a “minor character” that we really liked. Ronaldo in Tom Stone: Sweltering Summer Nights and Tom Stone: Day of the Dead.

He was one of the only people that our crook Anthony Angelino could trust. Ronaldo had done some bad things but was wanting to go straight. He lives in El Centro, CA, caring for his mother and running a flooring business.

EXCERPTS FROM TOM STONE: DAY OF THE DEAD

Available on Amazon in print and ebook

EXCERPT 1 Ronaldo basked in relief after reading Angel’s letter. Every word made it sound like his friend expected to be released from prison soon. The inventory of cocaine would be distributed and they would be rich men. Ronaldo adjusted the oxygen tank for his mother who was rocking slowly on the newly finished wooden floor. “Do you like how it shines, Mama?”

“It’s beautiful.” She stated it more as a fact than emotion.

A weight lifted as he considered what it would be like to never handle a gram of cocaine again in his life. He had made good money but had no inner peace. Knowing who to trust was difficult. The guy handing you a wad of hundred dollar bills could be an undercover narcotics agent ready to slap cuffs on your wrists.

EXCERPT 2 It was a life made for Angel. He thrived on the danger as though the excitement was its own drug. For Ronaldo, it was different. He simply enjoyed caring for his mother and running his flooring business.

A fan and filter in the central air conditioning unit scrubbed the dirt particles and circulated fresh air.

“You hear that?”

“Yes.” A smile creased her lips and for the first time in what seemed like years, Ronaldo saw his mother’s spirit lifted. Hope ran through his body like electricity zipping unnoticed into the controls for the temperature and lighting. While southern California’s Imperial County labored under the early October heat wave reaching triple digits, Ronaldo’s house was temperate and smelled clean. Mama’s steady breathing was proof that the dust swirling around El Centro remained outside.

No one questioned how Ronaldo had bought the new house in addition to fixing up his old one. He fixed the falling plaster and changed out the single pane windows to make it nice enough to rent out. Living in the new home with a shiny red tile roof and automatic sprinklers made Ronaldo feel on top of the world.

Tell us about the minor characters and minor moments you remember.

Letters from Prison and Our Tom Stone Crime Thriller

This is an excerpt from an actual letter that I, Don, received from my godson. He’s that in name only. We adopted his younger sister when she was a few years old. We didn’t know about M until he was 11 years old. He was the product of not just a broken home and family but one that was smashed and devastated by abuse.

Background for the Prison Letter

He’s been in and out of jail and prison the last few years. Since our Tom Stone stories deal with real life, I felt this prison letter excerpt would be appropriate. I may post other excerpts. I left in some misspellings and bad grammar usage and corrected others for readability.

Note: S.B. in the letter stands for San Bernardino

So much, so much in the last 2 wks. Riots, stabings raids and kilings here in the prison an drug overdoses[.] People been dying left an right. It’s been crazy and I got into some fights but I didn’t lost time we are now getting off lock down. We were on 24 hour lock down for 2 weeks an a few days I’m still not in school or any classes because I’m too short to the house is what my CCII tild me so I won’t be in anything. Anywayz I still haven’t got no word back about my probation statis if I’m going to S.B. or LA.

Have they talked to you guys? I know I’m on gang file which is all Bad for me if I have to go back to the S.B. Because I’m from a L.A. gang an the S.B. gangs don’t like L.A. gang members  like me. So hopefully I can go to LA. Anyways going through a lot.

People are coming at me, saying things to get me to get mad because I’m going home so I plan on staying in my cell for a few weeks to stay away from everyone, I’m ok anyways.

Let everyone in the church group I thank them so much for all the letters. It realy made my day. I even dropped a few tears. Please let them know I really thank them.

Well thank you so much for being by my side. Thank you an love you.

P.S. Can you please put $50 on my books?

M is the basis for the boy Andrew who’s featured in each Tom Stone story.

Detective Stone meets Andrew at a foster care group home in Tom Stone: A Nitty Gritty Christmas and befriends him, seeing that Andrew needs a family or else he’ll grow up in foster care and head right into prison.

Review of Drug Smuggling Movie: Sicario

Sicario (2015)–Juarez is seen through a chain link fence and a federal agent calls it The Beast and their mission is to drive to the Juarez courthouse, pick up a convicted member of a drug cartel and get him back across the border to El Paso for interrogation.

Staying alive is the challenge.

Sicario is an intense portrayal of smuggling drugs along the U.S. Mexico border. Lon watched it while we were in the early stages of writing our 4th novel Tom Stone: One Shot, One Kill and told me I should definitely see it. By the way, click here to read up on our crime books.

Emily Blunt as Agent Kate Macer; Josh Brolin as Matt Graver, Benicio Del Toro as Alejandro and Victor Garber as Dave Jennings. Personally, Victor Garber is one of my favorite actors over the years. Did you know he was the original Jesus in the Godspell movie from 1972?

Denis Villeneuve directed and Taylor Sheridan was the writer.

At the end this post, I included a scene from the movie.

Sicario Summary

I stopped writing for a couple of hours to take in the experience. Filmmaking and acting are about moments and Sicario has plenty of them – nice, tense moments that tie the story together instead of being a big, noisy shoot ‘em out kind of flick.

The Movie’s Opening

It begins with a raid on a middle-class housing development in Chandler, Arizona with a shoot ‘em out opening. A combatant is killed inside a bedroom where the walls are unfinished and there’s no furniture.

He lies dead and an agent notices something odd beneath the drywall. It gets ripped back and there are human remains in plastic bags stuffed into the walls. I got it, but the camera pulls back and the scene quickly switches to the medical examiners in haz mat suits and others on the scene while we see the agents outside, vomiting and recovering from what they experienced.

The Mood

This is a personally intense exploration of fighting drugs smugglers who live opulent lives from the suffering of others. The quick glimpses of some mutilated bodies and other violence shows up but it’s not the focus.

The FBI agents are filled with personal conflict while working with the CIA operatives who don’t follow the book in how they handle their targets.

It’s realistic, says Lon, and the tension comes during moments keeping you wondering what will happen next.

While flying on a private jet from Phoenix to El Paso, Agent Macer is sitting by Alejandro while Josh Brolin’s character is napping on the jet’s sofa. She notices Alejandro’s hand shaking and shaking and he jolts awake and she jumps. A wonderfully done moment letting the viewer experience what’s happening inside the character – an achievement in film and writing novels, especially thriller novels.

The Ending

I won’t spoil it – although it’s been out for a good four years at this point. But the ending is a personal vendetta for Alejandro who’s out to avenge the death of his wife and daughter, victims of the cartels.

You get this feeling that Alejandro is a good guy buy with a bad guy attitude.

Recommendation

I highly recommend it. Even for those who don’t like shoot ‘em up movies, it’s a good portrayal of what happens when people are out pursuing the millions upon millions of dollars by smuggling drugs.

Here’s a link to Sicario’s page on IMDB.

Tying it in to our Tom  Stone Thriller Novels

Covers for action thriller Tom Stone Detective Stories on Amazon
Racing through the streets of Los Angeles neighborhoods in pursuit of justice.

Our stories take place in Los Angeles with a twisted entrepreneur Anthony Angelino seeking to build his fortune through smuggling and operating a legal marijuana dispensary.

While ours contain some violence, it’s not gratuitous and we have many real life moments that are tense in and of themselves.

Here’s one: a dream that Angelino has in Tom Stone: Sweltering Summer Nights Chapter Ten:

The copter took off with its propellors blasting through the air and left Los Angeles behind and made its way northeast over the San Gabriel Mountains and into the high desert. Angelino wanted to scream for it to stop, but the words were strangled in his throat. The man next to him had no face and stayed silent. They reached the highest possible altitude and when there were no houses or freeways below, the faceless man opened the side of the door and grabbed him.

Angelino bolted upright, screamed again, and kicked.

“Ow, Babe.” Sara curled to one side and reached for where Angelino had kicked her.

His chest heaved and sweat poured from his forehead. He swung his legs off the bed, and in the darkness he put his feet on the floor until relief flooded him.

Nightmares were like a sign of weakness. When he was a kid, after his father was killed, he would wake up screaming in the night and his mother would cradle him and pray. That wouldn’t help him now.

The novel is available on Amazon.

Hey, if you want a dose of family and tension, read our thriller short story A Deadly Path – a father and son hike in the foothills above Los Angeles goes bad and leads to solving a cold case murder.

Los Angeles Crime Stats and Our Tom Stone Thriller Novels

What’s the crime rate in Los Angeles, the city for our Tom Stone Detective Stories?

Crime in Los Angeles is our Week 3 blog feature.

The City of Angels has plenty of bad guys and heinous crimes and the actual crime rate is a little fuzzy depending on classifications.

Homicides in Los Angeles

In 2013, Los Angeles reported 296 homicides in the city proper, which corresponds to a rate of 6.3 per 100,000 population—a notable decrease from 1980, when the all time homicide rate of 34.2 per 100,000 population was reported for the year.[2]

In 2014, there were 260 homicides, at a rate of 6.7 per 100,000 people.

Compare to 2002. This info table from City Data shows 654 murders per 100,000 people.

Violent Crimes in Los Angeles

In 2015, it was revealed that the LAPD had been under-reporting crime for eight years, making the crime rate in the city appear much lower than it really is. Approximately 14,000 assaults went unreported as “minor offenses” rather than violent crimes.[4] Additionally, recent years have seen increased crime in the city.

Safest Los Angeles Neighborhoods

Here’s another look at crime from a site called Neighborhood Scout that lists the 10 safest neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The top three are in the western San Fernando Valley.

#1 is Victory Boulevard and Balboa Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley.

#2 Topanga Canyon Boulevard

#3 Mulholland Drive / Sepulveda

Van Nuys

Our stories run quite frequently through Van Nuys, a part of Los Angeles that’s filled with car dealerships and is home to the Van Nuys airport, one of the busiest municipal airports in the nation.

Violent crimes aren’t too bad in the area, according to info from Home Facts.com.

Property crimes are a greater risk in the area than violent crimes.

Street gangs aren’t known for being too blood-thirsty.

Drug Smuggling in Los Angeles

The Port of Long Beach – Los Angeles is one of the busiest in the world. It’s known for receiving shipments and sending, too, as noted in this excerpt Feb 2019 from the Los Angeles Times:

Federal authorities seized more than 1.7 tons of methamphetamine, cocaine and heroin hidden in two containers that were being shipped to Australia from the Los Angeles-Long Beach seaport, officials announced Thursday.

Six people, two Americans and four Australians, with ties to a transnational crime syndicate based in the U.S. were arrested by Australian Federal Police in connection with the shipment, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said.

Crimes in our Tom Stone Detective Stories books

Our crimes are committed on a more individualized basis, although they do include drug running and cocaine smuggling—and mob bosses pushed out of helicopters, too.

In Book 1 Tom Stone: A Nitty Gritty Christmas cocaine is stuffed into candy bars and sets off Tom Stone’s chase of Anthony Angelino. Angelino is a twisted entrepreneur who services his own network of vending machines – and boxes of candy – perfect for smuggling.

At the end we have a brief excerpt from A Nitty Gritty Christmas.

Book 2 Tom Stone: Sweltering Summer Nights … Angelino buys a legal marijuana dispensary and the mob muscles in on his profits, takes him over, and pushes him into smuggling cocaine.

Book 3 Tom Stone: Day of the Dead … Angelino double-crosses the mob boss, Frank DeVito, and lays claim to the cocaine shipment.

Book 4 Tom Stone: One Shot, One Kill … brings the series together – this is a Work-in-Progress and we’re aiming for a mid-June 2019 release.

Angelino’s Defense Attorney – a Key player in the Tom  Stone series

Alisha Davidson is a tough defense attorney who cares about the law as much as Tom Stone. She looks out for her clients and comes to Anthony Angelino’s defense – while striking up a romance with Stone.

She leverages the mob crashing in on Angelino’s business.

In real-life Los Angeles, there are attorneys who specialize in defending drug smuggling charges.

EXCERPT FROM TOM STONE: A NITTY GRITTY CHRISTMAS

Tom Stone and his partner Jake Sharpe are hunting down tainted candy and their search has taken them to a bar in North Hollywood. The owner, Yaro, has a machine that’s stocked by Anthony Angelino.

“You need help?” asked Yaro. He smiled and raised his eyebrows like he was amused by the spectacle of a couple dozen bars lying ripped open on the table. Before Stone could tell him “no” he reached in the machine, grabbed a bar and ripped it open. His eyes grew wide. “Hey.” He dropped it on the table like it was poison. “What’s that white shit in there?”

“How about that?” exclaimed Jake.

“We’ll bag this one up,” said Stone.

Jake took a bag with a colorful picture of peanuts on the bright red packaging from the same row. C9. He ripped it open and emptied it on the table. Nuts scattered along with a tiny bag with what looked like white powder inside. “Damn.”

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Crime Thrillers and Stupid Criminal Stories: Week 2 Feature

Stupid criminal stories gives us a chance to chuckle while we write our Tom Stone Detective thriller novels and short stories. In week two of each month, we’ll feature a story that shows not only does crime not pay, it’s sometimes good for a laugh or two.

Here are selections from the Reader’s Digest: The 15 Unluckiest Dumb Criminals Ever featuring this little escapade that gets you right up the nose.

Drug thieves in Silver Springs, Florida broke into a home and saw three jars. Whoa! Their lucky day. Cocaine, no question about it. They grabbed the jars, took them home, snorted them down, got caught and discovered the jars were urns and they were snorting the remains of the victim’s husband and two dogs.

We’ll have the link to the Reader’s Digest crime shorts down below. ‘

In other news:

Hey, look at what’s new: a sneak preview of Tom Stone Chapter 1 from our upcoming book Tom Stone: One Shot, One Kill.

Get in on the fun this month by clicking here and joining our reader’s group.

You can also email me, Don, directly at dsimkovich@gmail.com if you have any questions or problems accessing the sign up form. We do not spam. We send out our newsletter from one to two times per month.

In other thriller and crime news, we got a new 5-Star Review for our thriller novel Tom Stone: Day of the Dead. It’s brief but nice. And you can read it by clicking here on the Amazon page.

If you’re new to our blog, here’s a good post that will orient you to what it’s about. It’s titled If you’re new to our crime thriller blog.

Now, you can dig into those Reader’s Digest brief stupid criminal stories by clicking here on this url: https://www.rd.com/funny-stuff/dumb-criminals-unlucky/.